­
Chris Appleby Ministries

Chris Appleby Ministries

 

audio

Heb 4:6-8;    Eph 1: 3-14;   Luke 11:1-13  

I wonder, if you were here last week, how what Steve said about prayer has affected your prayer life, especially what he said about prayer in times of difficulty, when you just can’t find the words to use.

But maybe that isn’t your problem. Maybe you’re happy to pray whatever your circumstances. Or is your problem that you’re not sure if you’re good enough to pray? Are there times when you feel like you’ve been so disobedient that God won’t hear you; or perhaps that your problems are so insignificant that you shouldn’t worry God with them?

Well, as Linus would say good theology can be very reassuring.  

 

Mark 1:35-39  audio

I guess you’ve worked out by now, if you’ve been here over the last three weeks that the theme of this sermon series is cutting back on the busyness of life.

What do you think? Is your life too busy? Do you find yourself trying to pack as much in to your life as you can?

I wonder have you done any of these things:

  • Stopping at an airport stopover on the way to holidays to visit friends or relatives you haven’t seen for a couple of years?
  • If you’re a parent do you find yourself dropping one child at ballet, taking the next to a piano lesson, doing the shopping then hurrying back to pick them up in the reverse order?
  • If you’re a worker do you find yourself arranging meetings one after the other with no break in between?

I haven’t done all of those, but I know others who do.

This was the final in a series based on "Everyday Church: Gospel Communities on Mission" by Tim Chester and Steve Timmis.

Audio           1 Pet 3:8-5:11

At the margins?

It’s ironic that we’re talking about hope at the margins today, sitting in a church in the inner city. But of course we’re not talking about being at the margins geographically. We’re talking about socially, philosophically. We’re talking about our morals, our ethics, our worldview; we’re talking about the basis on which we make our decisions, live our lives. We’re talking about our belief systems, in particular our belief in a God who created and maintains the universe; and who’s intervened in our world to bring us salvation, redemption, freedom; who’s promised us the hope of glory in his presence forever.
All of that puts us far out from the centre of Australian society. You know we have this myth that Australia is a Christian country. Certainly much of our national ethos derives from Christian values: love your neighbour as yourself; do unto others as you’d have them do to you; justice and fairness for all; care for others in need. But the reality is that worshipping Christians have never been in the majority in Australia and our influence appears to get weaker every year.

audio               2 Tim 3:14 - 4:5

I wonder how many of you are old enough to remember a TV show called the Greatest American Hero. It was about an ordinary guy who encounters aliens, who’ve decided that earth’s in such a bad way it needs saving. So they give him a belt that gives him super powers. They also give him a set of instructions for using the belt but somehow he manages to lose them; and so he blunders from one adventure to another, never really working out how to control these new super powers. I mention that because it’s something of a parable of many Christians who’ve received the gift of the Holy Spirit, have been brought into the people of God, but they don’t really know how to live from then on, because they’ve forgotten to read the instruction manual. It’s not that they’ve lost the instructions but they’ve never stopped to read the details. In some cases they’ve never had their own copy of the instructions or the one they have isn’t readable because it’s in such old fashioned language. So, let me ask you,

Does it matter if I read my Bible regularly?

The Trouble with Work   audio

Gen 3:16-19

[{Based on the book: Every Good Endeavour by Tim Keller}

Benjamin Franklin once wrote that nothing in this world can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.  But of course he could have added work to that short list, couldn't he?

To reword a proverb recorded by Erasmus: “Work: you can’t live with it; and you can’t live without it.”

That’s the trouble with work. We want to do it. If you’ve ever been unemployed you’ll know how much you wish you had a job. I retired from being a Vicar about 12 months ago and it was great for about 3 weeks, then I started looking for things to do: because life quickly gets boring without any work to do.

But on the other hand, work is a pain; it’s often hard, or boring, or frustrating. Not that we should be surprised, if we’re familiar with the creation story from Gen 2-3. 

Contact Details

Phone: 0422187127
 
­